Reference Items
Dug relics
Dug British Navy Sash Buckle

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Both parts of a British Navy Sash Buckle. Found in an 1862 Confederate training camp in Arkansas. This represents one of the multitude of items imported from Great Britain into the Confederate States. Many odd and unusual artifacts of English origin are found in Trans-Mississippi rebel campsites.

Member - Thomas Bowen
Item #: CIV-256

Dug Borman Fuse

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Borman Fuse – Standard Federal time fuse for spherical artillery rounds. Made out of a lead/white metal alloy, these fuses burn for up to 5 ½ seconds in flight before setting off the shell. Found in NW Arkansas on an 1862 battlefield.

Member - Thomas Bowen
Item #: CIV-255

Excavated Cohorn Mortar Ball

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24 pound Cohorn Mortar ball – Found in wet conditions, or waterlogged soil – the lack of oxygen and the iron oxides from the ball worked to preserve the wooden sabot. Found in Virginia.

Member - Thomas Bowen
Item #: CIV-254

Bullet In Wood

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One of the most interesting of relics found near Civil War battlefields are bullets encased in wood tree trunks, branches or even fence posts. As limbs and trees rot away, the oxides of lead leaching out of bullets preserves the wood around them for hundreds of years. The oxides prevent mold and bacteria growth in the wood and preserve a "moment in time” when the minie ball smashed into the wood. Found in Virginia.

Member - Thomas Bowen
Item #: CIV-253

Dug Frame of an 1863 Springfield Revolver

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1863 Springfield Revolver – This rare model pistol was made only in the year 1863 – The company was shut down because of patent infringements. This revolver was excavated in Virginia.

Member - Thomas Bowen
Item #: CIV-252

Cartridge Box Roller Buckle in Cedar Root

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This is a cartridge box roller buckle ingrown amidst a cedar root. Found in Southwestern Missouri in a Federal camp which was occupied in 1862. In the interim years, a cedar root grew around and through the buckle and was preserved.

Member - Thomas Bowen
Item #: CIV-251

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